Treelines:Week of December 17, 2014


 

Because urban forestry issues span a wide range of topics and are constantly a source of local, national, and international news, we think it’s important to provide you with the most up-to-date information on everything tree-related: from local and national headlines to the latest in research and technologies, to simply feel-good stories.

Look for our reoccurring Treelines every week right here on Tree Speak + updates on our social channels, Facebook and Twitter.

This week in the Treelines…

 

‘The main point is that to get a majestic landscape, we have to persist to get these trees growing to maturity,’ she said. ‘Because in too many jurisdictions, the city will brag about having planted X number of trees. The issue is, do they make it?’… Although RMA (Restore Mass Ave) is focused on one stretch of Massachusetts Avenue, Shapley noted, the work the group has done is relevant to other parts of the city.”

 

‘What we’re trying to do is re-create the condition of the original headwater streams, to provide habitat and prevent pollution,’ says Steve Saari, who manages the Washington, D.C., projects as a watershed specialist with the District’s Department of the Environment...in recent years many cities have been undoing the past century’s drainage projects, uncovering or “daylighting” buried streams.”

 

“‘People are obsessed with their solar monitoring,’ said Jonathan Bass, VP of Communications for SolarCity. To give those customers more options for geeking out on energy use, SolarCity has a new app, MySolarCity, which shows real-time home energy usage and offers basic energy assessments, as well as providing social network via which users can share their solar experiences.”

 

Unlike fossil fuels such as coal and oil, wood is a renewable fuel: Where one tree goes down, another can grow. As a weapon against climate change, however, harvesting mass quantities of forest and shipping them across the Atlantic has drawn skepticism.

 

“The conviction that America can fuel its economy by churning out massive amounts of natural gas for decades has become a core assumption of national energy policy. But what if it’s wrong?”

 

You’ll no longer be allowed to kill coyotes, foxes, bobcats, and other animals to win a prize in California…[Camilla] Fox also calls the contests a safety concern for humans, pointing to a February incident in California’s El Dorado County in which a game warden who was patrolling a predator killing contest at night was mistakenly shot.”

 

Don’t forget to check back next week for more Treelines! Any thoughts on these articles? Post your comments or questions below or via our social media channels - Facebook.. Twitter.. thanks!

Introducing our Science and Technology Committee


Casey Trees harnesses the talents and energy of many to advance its programs and mission. We are truly humbled by the thousands of volunteers who plant, advocate and mentor on our behalf. We couldn’t what we do without individuals stepping forward to say — let me help. Today, four longtime friends of Casey Trees are doing just that.

We are thrilled to announce that Dr. Jason Grabosky, Dr. Ed Gilman, Dr. David Nowak and Dr. Richard Olsen have joined our Science and Technology Committee, an ad-hoc committee of our board of directors, as adjunct members to ensure that our research agenda supports our mission and the information we provide the public is scientifically accurate. They join board members Jim Sherald and Greg Ina, and staff members Mark Buscaino and Dr. Jessica Sanders.

With their invaluable guidance, Casey Trees looks to expand our research initiatives into new areas and broaden connections to other individuals, institutions and localities.

Please join me in welcoming our new adjunct members to the Casey Trees family. New Science and Technology Committee adjunct members at a glance:


Dr. Jason Grabosky
Professor, Urban Forestry, Rutgers B.S. Cal Poly; M.S., Ph.D, Cornell
Interests: urban tree management in development and maintenance of urban landscapes, storm water management for urban sustainability, root-pavement conflicts


Dr. David Nowak
Project Leader, USDA Forest Service B.S., M.S., SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Ph.D, University of California, Berkeley
Interests: changes in urbanization and urban forest structure, assessments of those structures and their short and long-term effects through computer modeling and traditional monitoring


Dr. Richard Olsen Research Geneticist, U.S. National Arboretum B.S., NC State, M.S. University of Georgia, Ph.D NC State Interests: genetic improvement of landscape trees against pests, diseases, non-invasiveness, and ornamental traits. Genetic resources and evaluation of woody landscape plant germplasm.

Dr. Ed Gilman (Photo Not Available)
Professor, Urban Trees & Landscape Plants, University of Florida B.S., M.S., Ph.D, Rutgers Interests: tree and shrub production practices, particularly the impact of landscape pruning practices

Years of Plantings at The Park at LeDroit: A Profile

Casey Trees plants trees across the District through several programs including our flagship Community Tree Planting (CTP) program. Groups identify locations for ten or more trees and if their application is approved, they receive the trees, tools and technical assistance at no cost. It’s a win-win for the group and our urban forest.

One location that is particularly special to us is The Park at LeDroit located at 3rd and Elm Street Northwest near Howard University. Since 2008 we have worked with several partners who share and enjoy that site to plant more than 90 trees. With each planting, we have helped transform the space and the neighborhood, allowing the community to grow and thrive.

Here is a short history of our engagement at The Park at LeDroit:

April 2009 — Casey Trees works with Common Good City Farm — located on the grounds of the park — to plant more than 30 fruit trees including apple, peach, cherry, pawpaw and beach plum to advance the group’s mission of growing food, educating and helping low-income D.C. community members meet their food needs. These trees are now bearing fruit!





April 2012 — We return to The Park at LeDroit to plant 15 more fruit trees at the LeDroit Park Community Garden to complement the vegetables and flowers neighborhood residents are growing in the 50+ raise beds. Visit this popular community garden in the spring and summer to see established persimmon, fig and pear trees.





October 2014 — Casey Trees — with support from the Sustainable DC Budget Challenge Grant — partners with the LeDroit Park Civic Association to replace dead and dying trees and boost overall tree canopy. In just six hours, we plant 46 shade trees with more than 90 volunteers. In just a few years, these trees will provide the shade and charm that was so desperately missing when the park was created on the site of the former Gage-Eckington Elementary School. Watch the video to see us and our volunteers in action.





Years from now – We love returning to formerly planted at sites to add more trees as neighborhood residents identify a need. We look forward to working with the greater LeDroit Park and Bloomingdale neighborhoods to continue re-treeing their homes and treasured public spaces.

Love what we do? Consider supporting our planting efforts with a year-end gift. Make your contribution by December 31 for a 2014 tax deduction. Your generosity will ensure we can continue planting trees at deserving locations all across the District.

Treelines: Week of December 10, 2014


 

Because urban forestry issues span a wide range of topics and are constantly a source of local, national, and international news, we think it’s important to provide you with the most up-to-date information on everything tree-related: from local and national headlines to the latest in research and technologies, to simply feel-good stories.

Look for our reoccurring Treelines every week right here on Tree Speak + updates on our social channels, Facebook and Twitter.

This week in the Treelines…

 

“The renderings for the project show, on the side of Fifth Street opposite Union Market where Edens is now buying up old warehouses, images of a Nike store, H&M, Corner Bakery, Nautica, and Ann Taylor. Those could be for illustrative purposes only, or, perhaps a hint of what’s to come.

 

“A warming climate is melting Glacier’s glaciers, an icy retreat that promises change not just tourists’ vistas, but also the mountains and everything around them...And while glaciers came and went millenniums ago, the changes this time are unfolding over a Rocky Mountain landscape of big cities, sprawling farms, and growing industry.

 

“Urban Timberworks is part of a growing industry built upon the salvaged wood of the West: Urban Hardwoods in Seattle, Urban Woods in Los Angeles, and Goby Walnut in Portland all adhere to similar models … When a tree needs to come down …[they are] sawn into hefty slabs and rest in a drying facility for a few years to stabilize … [soon a] small crew of woodworkers deftly transforms the slabs into unique book-matched tables, live-edge counter-tops, and exquisitely marbled cabinetry.

 

The soccer deal benefited from the project’s relatively modest scale, the desire to kick-start development in a gritty industrial zone, and the team’s willingness to bear the roughly $150 million costs of building the stadium itself – the most expensive Major League Soccer facility proposed to date.

 

“The Nanoleaf really is a whole different kind of device from any other LED. It is actually a printed circuit board with LEDs mounted on it, which is then folded up into a bulb shape…This is a very powerful bulb, with the brightest pumping out 1800 lumens at a very efficient 150 lumens per watt of warm 3000K light. They claim it will last 27 years.”

 

“Roadside and Community Three each have strong motivation to fight for the property, led mostly by the architects on each team...Each have proposed tearing down a gym facing 9 1/2 Street and replacing it with townhomes, as well as bringing in some nonprofit partners and ground-floor retail to the space.

 

Don’t forget to check back next week for more Treelines! Any thoughts on these articles? Post your comments or questions below or via our social media channels - Facebook.. Twitter.. thanks!

10 Things We Are Thankful For This Holiday Season

It’s the week of Thanksgiving and people all around the country are taking stock of what they are thankful for this holiday season. We at Casey Trees are no different. We have looked back at this past year with fond memories of our plantings, classes and the communities that we have transformed, tree-by-tree and chose 10 things we are the most thankful for.
(more…)

Tree of the Month: Persimmon

The American persimmon, first documented in Virginia in 1609 by the English captain John Smith and later named Diospyros virginiana, is native to the majority of the Eastern and Midwestern United States. Although alien to the newly arrived settlers, who were unsure of what to make of its bitter fruit, it was a vital part of southeastern Native Americans’ diet. The American persimmon today is characterized most notably for its fruit, as well as its bark and leaves. (more…)

DC PLUG Webinar Recap

On November 12, Casey Trees hosted the DC PLUG: Burying Lines, Raising Questions webinar in partnership with John P. Thomas, Associate Director of Urban Forestry Administration and Nathan McElroy and Scott Placide from Pepco to address the impact of DC PLUG on street trees. (more…)

Treelines: Week of November 13, 2014

 


 

Because urban forestry issues span a wide range of topics and are constantly a source of local, national, and international news, we think it’s important to provide you with the most up-to-date information on everything tree-related: from local and national headlines to the latest in research and technologies, to simply feel-good stories.

Look for our reoccurring Treelines every week right here on Tree Speak + updates on our social channels, Facebook and Twitter.

This week in the Treelines…

 

“…the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency released a guide to help local governments, water utilities, nonprofit organizations, neighborhood groups, and other stakeholders integrate green infrastructure strategies to better manage stormwater. This approach also has the benefit of helping communities to achieve other environmental, public health, social, and economic benefits.”

 

The new research shows that since 1979, the dry season in southern parts of the Amazon rainforest has grown by about seven days per decade. The authors can’t definitively link the changes to any one factor, but say the trend they observed resembles the effect of climate change.

 

Lower Barracks Row will finally get its beer garden. It’s been a four year journey, but a permit for the construction of a traditional beer garden, with an accessory space for food trucks…will seat 210 and serve 299.”

 

‘The child is the father of the man,’ said Wordsworth… our bodies are not elaborate machines. We might be able to fit impressive prosthetics, transplant organs, and develop smart drugs. But we can’t do without our ecosystems, and we can’t replace them.

 

‘The discovery of a new frog species from the urban Northeast is truly remarkable and completes a journey that began six years ago with a simple frog call in the wilds of New York City’… The scientists traced the call to the leopard frog. DNA testing revealed that it was a previously undocumented species.

 

CO2 capture and storage is not as simple as locking away carbon deep underground. As Jones notes, the process will perpetuate fossil fuel use and may prove a wash as far as keeping global warming pollution out of the atmosphere.”

 

Don’t forget to check back next week for more Treelines! Any thoughts on these articles? Post your comments or questions below or via our social media channels - Facebook.. Twitter.. thanks!