Blog Post By Jona Elwell

We Updated our Blossoming Tree Map

Tourists from all over the country — even the world — flock to D.C. to get a glimpse (and the perfect Instagram) of the cherry blossoms lining the Tidal Basin. However, the Tidal Basin is not the only place to find those cherry blossoms — nor is the cherry tree the only tree that produces beautiful blooms!

Many trees from the American Linden to the magnolia produces gorgeous flowers and blossoms! Now to figure out where to find these majestic blooms. We’ve made it easy and updated our Blossoming Tree Map! Check it out:

This features numerous flowering trees in D.C. including (but certainly not limited to) the:

Flowering Dogwood (Cornus)
With showy, fragrant, white flowers, the flowering dogwood is a small tree found in gardens and yards throughout the D.C. area. Its red berries are prized by wildlife and its flowers attract pollinators such as bees and butterflies. If stressed, dogwoods are susceptible to diseases – the most common is powdery mildew of the leaves – unsightly but not life-threatening for the tree. Plant some on your property for free (or get money back!) with our residential planting programs.

Tulip Tree (Liriodendron tulipifera)
Tulip trees, one of the largest native trees in North America, are fall-foliage stars. They get their name from the resemblance their flowers bear to the classic tulip flower. Tulip trees can be identified by their goblet shaped leaves: The tip almost looks like someone came along and took a bite out of them. Plant some on your property for free (or get money back!) with our residential planting programs.

American Linden (Tilia americana)
For a tree with many common names (it’s also known as the American basswood or lime) it has just as many honey bee pollinators. With nectar irresistible to honey bees, some beekeepers even market basswood honey! This stately shade tree has delicate pea-shaped fruits hanging from wing-shaped bracts. Look for them along Embassy Row on Massachusetts Avenue – D.C.’s historic linden corridor. Plant some on your property for free (or get money back!) with our residential planting programs.

Crape Myrtle (Lagerstroemia)
A small, flowering tree that will provide shade when fully-grown, the crape myrtle not only has wonderful, showy flowers that can range from white to deep purple, it also has smooth, ornate bark that peels as the tree gets older. Many varieties were developed right here in D.C. at the U.S. National Arboretum – where many crape myrtles may be found. Plant some on your property for free (or get money back!) with our residential planting programs.

This map displays trees inventoried by our park inventory program or planted by Casey Trees or the Urban Forestry Division of DDOT (UFD). The park inventory program is a collaboration between Casey Trees, UFD, the D.C. Department of Parks and Recreation and the National Parks Service. As we are still in the progress of inventorying every park in the District, data on some parks may be missing (feel free nominate a park that needs inventorying to help us out!). This map also does not contain trees planted on private or residential properties. If you are interested in add additional flowering trees to D.C. sign up for a volunteer plantings or inventory events!

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